Bahamas, Bahamas

Vacations, Travel and Tourism to The Bahamas

Welcome to The Bahamas

Discover why so many consider the Bahamas a true tropical paradise. In this incredibly beautiful destination, your dream vacation will become a reality. Experience adventure and tranquility in a fascinating setting.

Description

Welcome to The Bahamas

The Bahamas is made up of 700 breathtaking islands spread out over 500 square miles of crystal clear turquoise water. The 14 main islands are: Nassau/Paradise Island (the capital of the Bahamas), Grand Bahama, Abacos, Acklins/Crooked Island, Andros, Berri Island, Bimini, Cat Island, Eleuthera/Harbor Island, Exumas, Inagua, Long Island, Mayaguana and San Salvador.

The Bahamas offers visitors much diversity, as each island possesses its own charm, cultural heritage, natural landscapes, and adventurous activities.

Welcome to The Bahamas

Home to the world's third largest coral reef, diving and snorkeling spots surround the Bahaman islands on every side. Tourism, banking, and foreign investment are the islands' principal economic activities. Exports from the Bahamas include rum, pharmaceuticals, cement, salt, seafood, and refined oil products.

History

Welcome to The Bahamas

The Bahamas has a rich and unique history. The name comes from Christopher Columbus, who set foot on the island of San Salvador in 1492. Upon seeing the shallow waters surrounding the islands, he named the region "Baja Mar" ("Shallow Sea"), which over time has transformed into the name used today: The Bahamas.

The strategic location of the Bahamas, right next to Florida, made it an important navigation route for explorers, colonists, invaders, merchants, and pirates, all of which contributed to the fascinating history of the dazzling islands.

Welcome to The Bahamas

Before the arrival of Columbus, the Bahamas was inhabited by the Lucayos, a subgroup of the indigenous Arahuacos of the West Indies. The Lucayos fled from the West Indies toward the Bahamas to evade the cannibalistic warrior natives of the Caribbean. The Lucayos dedicated themselves to agriculture, religion, and politics. However, with the arrival of Columbus, the Lucayos were taken into slavery and shipped to the island of Hispaniola to work in the mines. Following 25 years of hard labor, the tribe became extinct after suffering from widespread disease and horrific working conditions.

Welcomte to The Bahamas

In 1648, a group of English puritans known as "Eleutherans" formed the Bahamas' first settlement on the island of Eleuthera. Later, during the United States Civil War, a group of English colonists from the US came to the Bahamas, bringing with them slaves and knowledge of agriculture, shipbuilding, and architecture. The group, known as the Legalists, demanded the withdrawal of the Spanish and brought independence to the islands. The Bahamas was declared a British colony in 1783, and gained independence in 1973. It is now a member of the Commonwealth of Nations.

Pirate Era

Welcome to The Bahamas

Since the Bahamas formed part of a highly transited trade route, pirate attacks on merchant ships became very common. The late 1600's and early 1700's marked the largest surge of pirates and corsairs, such as Calico Jack, Sir Henry Morgan, Sir Francis Drake and Edward Teach, more commonly known as Blackbeard. The corsairs attacked enemy ships upon request by the government, and pirates assaulted any vessel that got in their way.

The constant fear of pirate attacks led to rampant treasure burial. Treasures were hidden in caves or buried underground all over the islands, giving the Bahamas the air of mystery and adventure that characterizes it today.

Beaches

Welcome to The Bahamas

Sun, sand, sea, and culture best define the Bahamas. The clear waters and sandy beaches are perfect for long walks along the coast, water sports and activities, or sunbathing alongside the swaying palm trees.

Never ending miles of white sands fuse with the turquoise sea, creating the amazing beaches of the beautiful Bahamas. Enjoy intense moments of relaxation and solitude, or experience the excitement of the many aquatic activities the islands have to offer.

Read more about Bahamas

See what's nearby