Copper Canyon, Mexico

  • Copper Canyon Vacations

Copper Canyon Attractions | Things to do in Copper Canyon

Copper Canyon Deals | Hotels in Copper Canyon  | Tours in Copper Canyon

Copper Canyon

Copper Canyon is an attraction that offers lots to discover, including spectacular geography, local indigenous groups, and towns that are rich in history and culture. One of the highlights of visiting the region is the opportunity to enjoy a variety of adventure sports and ecotourism activities.

Adventure and Ecotourism

Ecotourism Activities in Copper Canyon

Adventure travel and ecotourism are great reasons to visit the Sierra Tarahumara and admire the incredible beauty of the region. Every summer the Adventure Tourism Festival takes place in the towns of Creel and Guachochi, with mountain biking, triathlon, and ultra-marathon competitions, as well as half marathon and 10k races.

Cerocahui

Cerocahui

From the Bahuichivo train station you’ll travel 11 miles along a dirt road to reach Cerocahui. The town was founded in 1680, by Juan Maria de Salvaterra, a Jesuit missionary who built the San Francisco Javier de Cerocahui Mission in the town center. From here, you can access the most spectacular lookout point in the canyon. Located at the top of Gallego Mountain, it overlooks the 6,165-foot-deep Urique Canyon, the deepest in the Sierra Tarahumara.

Creel

Creel

This town is located 7,350 feet above sea level and is a strategic point for visitors to the canyons of the Sierra Tarahumara. The town economy used to be dependent on the mills. Nowadays, tourism and trade are two of the most significant economic drivers. It has houses with gabled rooftops and is surrounded by pine and oak forests.

Along the main street you’ll find a variety of craft shops where you can buy clay pots, hand-woven baskets made of palm and pine, wood carvings, and traditional Tarahumara clothing. In Creel you can also enjoy adventure tourism, such as rock climbing, mountain biking, hiking, rappelling, and tours of the canyons.

Cusarare

Cusarare

This seventeenth-century Jesuit mission is located next to the Sacred Art Museum which displays oil paintings from the sixteenth, seventeenth and eighteenth centuries that were used to convert the natives to Christianity. You can follow a path into the forest to visit Cusarare Falls, a waterfall that reaches a height of 100 feet during the summer season and feeds into a large stream. Further along, you’ll find paintings depicting deer hunting.

Santa Maria de Guadalupe School and Boarding House

Santa Maria de Guadalupe School and Boarding House

This school welcomes visitors and serves a population of nearly 250 children. It is also home to 70 indigenous girls under the age of 15. The boarding house or "Tewecado," as it’s referred to in the language of the Tarahumara, means “Home for Girls,” and it was built to provide food, shelter, clothing, medical care, and education for the girls. It relies on the support of individuals and organizations to continue its educational and humanitarian efforts to improve the lives of Tarahumara children.

El Chepe

El Chepe

Since 1961, the "El Chepe" railroad has provided daily service through the Sierra Madre Occidental, showcasing one of the most significant features in the history and folklore of the Tarahumara culture: the Copper Canyon. The best way to tour the canyon is by train, and the Chihuahua – Pacifico Railroad is considered one of the most impressive feats of engineering in the world. It includes tourist stops in Chihuahua, Cuauhtemoc, Creel, Divisadero Barrancas, Bahuichivo, El Fuerte and Los Mochis.

Divisadero

Divisadero

Divisadero is one of the most popular tourist destinations in the canyon. Located 31 miles from the town of Creel, it is situated at the junction of the Urique and Tararecua canyons. It features several lookout points with spectacular views. This town is home to some of the best hotels in the region, where you can relax in comfort while enjoying breathtakingly beautiful views of the surrounding mountain landscape.

Aerial Cable Car, Ziplines and Suspension Bridges

Aerial Cable Car, Ziplines and Suspension Bridges

This ecotourism project can be enjoyed in the Divisadero area. It is considered one of the most impressive aerial cable cars in the world for the stunning topography, its length, and the amazing views that it offers. It takes just six minutes to get to the bottom of Urique Canyon, and it features five ziplines and three suspension bridges. The trails are designed for mountain bikers who are permitted to board the cable car with their bikes. This engineering feat is a huge step forward for alternative tourism in Chihuahua.

Mennonite Communities

Mennonite Communities

The Mennonites arrived in Chihuahua in 1922 from Canada and their presence often comes as a pleasant surprise to travelers passing through Cuauhtemoc. They can be seen in the city or countryside dressed in traditional sixteenth-century clothing, as is customary, and using horse-drawn carriages for transportation. The Mennonite Museum is housed in a typical Mennonite home and displays a collection of furniture and artifacts brought by the first settlers to the region.

Flying Stone Falls and Basaseachi Falls

Flying Stone Falls and Basaseachi Falls

With a height of 1,486 feet, Flying Stone Falls (Cascada de Piedra Volada) is the tallest waterfall in Mexico and the eleventh-tallest in the world. It is located 4.5 miles from Basaseachi Falls, which is the second tallest waterfall in the country with a height of more than 800 feet. Breathtakingly beautiful, it is surrounded by one of the best preserved pine forests in Mexico. This waterfall can only be reached on foot and all visitors must be accompanied by a local guide.

There are paths that lead to the Huajumar and Cerro de la Corona lookout points, which are situated across from the waterfall on the other side of the scenic Candamena Canyon. You can observe this incredible natural attraction from the top of the waterfall, its base, and several vantage points along the trail that leads through the forest to San Lorenzo.

Recohuata

Recohuata

The Recohuata hot springs are located at the bottom of Tararecua Canyon, where abundant warm water rises up from the rocks and is concentrated in five pools. The water temperature is naturally maintained at 95°F and there’s a campsite nearby. It is located a few miles southeast of Creel and is part of the Ejido San Ignacio, managed by the Raramuri.

San Ignacio de Arareko 

Arareko Lake

This traditional Tarahumara community is located five miles from Creel and its inhabitants are scattered over 50,000 acres of forest. Its center is in the Arareko Valley, where you’ll find the San Ignacio Mission, which serves as a meeting place for the entire community. The valley has been called the Valley of Mushrooms and Frogs because of its rock formations.

A few miles further on is Arareko Lake with its clear waters surrounded by rocks, and pine and oak trees with foliage that turns red and gold in the fall. Here, you can enjoy fishing or boat rides. 

Our customers' best rated hotels

View all hotels in Copper Canyon

Most popular attractions in Copper Canyon

View all tours in Copper Canyon

See what's nearby